Click on an image to enlarge it.

White Tulip And Green Apple

White Tulip And Green Apple

Peaches And Blues

Peaches And Blues

Sunset Dash

Sunset Dash

The Secret

The Secret

Undulation

Undulation

Mutual Conversation

Mutual Conversation

Dancing Nymphs

Dancing Nymphs

Innocence

Innocence

Interview with Maggie Terlecki, Photographer, (Val-d’Or) Quebec, Canada

 

EWW: I am curious to know what qualities of your work would others comment on first?

Maggie:  Actually, there are 3 things that come up over and over. People say they really

like the light and the composition. They also say that my images carry emotion and feeling.  These comments please me enormously, as they are perhaps the 3 things I strive for in my images.

 

EWW: What are your challenges when doing your art?

Maggie: Doing the art itself, is not very much a challenge for me as it allows me to express myself better than with words. I enjoy it so much. The challenges that I have

are perhaps the fact that I live in a small town far from the city and access to many things I find interesting, but I’ve found that doing still-life images (which I enjoy immensely) allows me to reign in my work to a small area. Of course, as I’m sure many artists have discovered financially, it is difficult to make a living doing art.

 

EWW: You have several galleries such Still Life, Tulips, floral, landscape, etc.  Do you have a favorite?  Why?

Maggie: I have fallen in love with doing Still Life images. I love doing the compositions and trying to find new ways to show things in a fresh way. The tulips are perhaps my favorite flower being so humble yet so elegant and although they have their own gallery, they are also part of my still life work; I just have a separate gallery to make them easier for people to find.

 

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run in all your work such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

Maggie: I enjoy taking photographs with the light coming from the back or the side instead of from the front. I think it gives interesting shadows and a depth to the objects that sometimes get flattened out if well-lit from the front. Also, even though I use flash once in a while, it is usually out of necessity, as I much prefer natural light. I like how soft and caressing it can be. As for movement, even though I do still life, I like flowers to have movement, to not look like they are stiff – to me, it makes them feel alive.

 

EWW:  Some of your art is in black and white versus color.  What is your decision-making process in terms of deciding on black and white or color?

Maggie: I think most of my work is in color, but black and white makes you notice different things like composition and texture. I like using it where normally you would expect color. Flowers are a good example. Seeing them in black and white helps you to appreciate their shape and how they’ve been composed. I also like to use color to express mood. A lot of my color images are not smack you in the face bright, but more subtle. I think that corresponds to my character too, though!

 

EWW:  Do you think it is important for photographic artists to have their own website, in addition to another gallery they appear on?  If so, why?

Maggie: Locally, I have my work in a small gallery. Clients that visit like to check out who you are online. When they find my website MaggieTerlecki.com , I think they feel that you are legitimate and makes them feel good about making a purchase of your work.

 

EWW:  What are your thoughts about using social media platforms to market and promote your art?  If you do use social media, which one(s) do you find to be the most effective for you?

Maggie: I wish I was better at selling myself, as it is not my forte, but social media has helped. I use Facebook, since the last 3 years and I know that I have made a few sales directly because someone has seen my work there. I also use twitter but have no idea if people buy my work because they have seen it there. I also post videos on YouTube once in a while that lets people see a compilation of my work at a time, often under a theme.

 

EWW:  Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?

Maggie: I think that I’m just a regular, down-to-earth person that attempts to express herself with photography and I think I have some important advice for others that may just be at the beginning of their journey.

– Let your work show who you are by being true to yourself in what you are showing others. The work of others may be really cool and inspire you, but you don’t want to be copying their work because that’s not who you are. When someone tells me “I saw this image and I knew it was yours without reading the name” it’s because my work shows my joys, my fears, my insecurities. It can be scary as what if they don’t like it? It’s risky, but you must do it to be proud of what you do. Otherwise, who cares?

– Remember that photography is about the light. It’s what turns a good composition into something magical. Wait for it; it’s worth it.

– You are never too young or old to start. I know a woman in Australia that started taking photographs in her 80’s. She’s going blind and wished she hadn’t waited so long. There’s never a better time than now!

– Sometimes you get moments where you fumble and can’t find yourself. Do it anyways. Often when things seem uninspiring, you will see the vision pop in your head while working. Maybe today everything you do goes into the garbage, but hey, tomorrow might be that day where it all turns out great.

– Just be aware. When you think there is nothing to take pictures of, really look. It can be in the street, it can be in the woods, it can be 3 feet from your desk. You’ll find it.

 

Website(s):

My Artist’s website at Fine Art America and Pixels:

http://maggieterlecki.pixels.com/

 

My portfolio at Fine Art America

https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/maggieterlecki

 

My personal website

http://www.maggieterlecki.com

 

My YouTube Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/chezeury

 

My Facebook Channel:

https://www.facebook.com/maggie.terlecki

 

My Twitter Channel:

https://twitter.com/chezeury

 

 

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Colorful Autumn Sunrise At Artist Point Arkansas Boston Mountains

Colorful Autumn Sunrise At Artist Point Arkansas Boston Mountains

Colorful Layers Of Antelope Canyon

Colorful Layers Of Antelope Canyon

Electric Night Cityplex Towers Tulsa Oklahoma

Electric Night Cityplex Towers Tulsa Oklahoma

Fall In Love Beaver Lake Sunrise Northwest Arkansas

Fall In Love Beaver Lake Sunrise Northwest Arkansas

Kansas City Skyline Over Union Station

Kansas City Skyline Over Union Station

Maroon Bells Aspen Colorado Monochrome American Southwest

Maroon Bells Aspen Colorado Monochrome American Southwest

Reflective Morning Aspen Colorado

Reflective Morning Aspen Colorado

Saint Louis Skyline Morning Under The Arch

Saint Louis Skyline Morning Under The Arch

 

Interview with Gregory Ballos
Photographer, Bentonville, Arkansas   USA

 

EWW: I am curious to know what qualities of your work would others comment on first?

Gregory: The most frequent comment I receive is my use of color and lighting to bring out some of the best aspects of a scene. These days I have found myself shooting a lot more localized work, around the Arkansas / Oklahoma / Missouri areas, and I absolutely love it when people see my work and it makes them feel really proud of where they are from. When people see one of my pieces of a location they may have been to many times, or perhaps have lived by their whole life, and they feel like I’ve conveyed it in a new and dynamic way they’ve never quite seen before, I feel like I’ve hit the nail on the head.

 

EWW: What are your challenges in doing your work?

Gregory: I think the biggest challenge for me would be continually scouting and traveling to new locations to capture new content, while also balancing the process of working through the many thousands of images I’ve taken over the years that are still waiting for the world to see them. As a photographer, I am constantly discovering new places to photograph, so it can be difficult sometimes to just put the camera away and focus on images I’ve already taken.

Knowing this, I try to dedicate time each morning or evening to working through older files and making sure I don’t miss a great image that was just left tucked away in a folder and nearly forgotten. In fact, I’ve noticed that some of my most popular images are ones that I’ve gone back to months (or even years) after shooting them. I actually think that giving an older image a new set of eyes (based on where my artistic eye is leading me in the present) can really help to create some amazing content.

 

EWW:  When doing a shoot, what are the challenges?

Gregory: Trying to capture the most amount of content possible to allow for the highest degree of creativity during post-processing. Early in my career, I used to just be happy if I came away from a shoot with one or two quality images when all was said and done. My goal now is to be as efficient as possible during my shoots in order to give me the best chances of producing several high-quality sellable images to display.

 

To do this I start planning a shoot far in advance and try to think about how I can make the most of my time on location. I’ve gotten a lot better at anticipating things I used to just react to on the fly. With landscape and cityscape photography there will always be a good amount of adjustments to be made off the cuff, so anything I can do to remove some of them on the front-side gives me my best opportunity to make a shoot as successful as it can be.

 

EWW: You have several galleries among them Minimalism, Dusk and Night. Water Forms, Travel Art and others. Do you have a favorite(s)?  Why?

Gregory: I love shooting a variety of scenes and conditions, but if I had to pick a favorite, I’d have to say a dusk/night or other low light (longer exposure) galleries. I typically don’t do much with my camera during daylight hours to be quite honest.

If you follow my work through the years you can see a progressive incline into more ethereal images utilizing longer exposures shot between dusk and dawn. I just feel the mood conveyed in low light situations through a photographic image is much more dynamic and impactful.

 

EWW: Some of your work is done in Black and White.  How do you choose whether an image ends up in color or black and white?

Gregory: It’s just all about whether I feel the image lends itself well to a good quality monochrome print. To me, an image has to have some really dynamic contrasts and lighting in order for me to feel good about making it into a black and white.

I absolutely love the simplicity and power of a good black and white, but some images, no matter how much I’d like to turn them B&W, are just flat and boring without the colors showing. Early on I used to try to “make” an image work in B&W and found out pretty quickly that it’s typically just a waste of my time and can even reduce a collector’s perception of my work’s quality in the end. Sacrificing quality and perception for an incremental piece just isn’t worth it to me.

 

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run in all your work such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

Gregory: I shoot predominantly longer exposures and often try to incorporate water reflections and/or light trails into my work. I have to believe that these two elements come from growing up in rural Northeast Ohio where we had (and parents still have) a small private lake behind our home. One of my fondest memories of my childhood is sitting out by the still waters in the evenings and just gazing at the cars passing by over the bridge on the other side of the waters. It’s kind of funny how things like that can stick with you. I didn’t really even make the connection until a couple years back when a few people commented on these elements being so often found in my photographs. I guess the things that brought me such joy as a child still give me a lot of internal peace in my photographic work today.

 

EWW:  Do you think it is important for photographic artists to have their own website, in addition to another gallery they appear on?  If so, why?

Gregory: I’d have to say yes. If for no other reason than just to have another contact point for potential buyers if the online gallery goes down. I’m a big fan of not having all my eggs in one basket. Some of the galleries (or marketplaces) available for photographers allow for a personal website and I think some of them can be quite powerful marketing tools. They are typically very stylish and easy to use. However, there is always the potential of the site being sold or going out of business. In that event, it would be quite unfortunate to have all of your work online go away overnight.

 

EWW:  Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work?  If you do use social media platform seems, which one(s) work the best for you?

 Gregory: I use Facebook mostly, IG a bit and Twitter very sparingly. In general, Facebook is the most successful for me in terms of sales. Facebook just feels more personal than all the rest which is why I tend to lean more towards their platform. IG and Twitter just seem to have become overcrowded and overused in my humble opinion.

 

EWW:  Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?

Gregory: That I’m just a constant learner when it comes to most things in life, and photography is no exception. I love experimenting with new approaches to shooting the various scapes that I find beautiful (which also tends to change and adapt over time as well). Also, I love the business side of photography as well. The marketing and selling of my artwork as well. My parents owned various small businesses throughout my childhood and being a small-business owner is just in my blood, I suppose. Photography allows me to showcase both my creative side through capturing beautiful cityscapes and landscapes as well as my analytical business side through running the day to day aspects of the craft. So all that to say, I truly enjoy what I do.

 

Website(s): http://gregoryballos.com

https://www.fineartscapes.com

https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/gregory-ballos.html

 

Tom Mc Nemar, Photographer, Ohio   USA

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Yesterday's Light

Yesterday's Light

Rustic Table Setting Still Life

Rustic Table Setting Still Life

Patriotism

Patriotism

Orchid   Sensuous Virtue

Orchid Sensuous Virtue

On The Seamy Side Of Town

On The Seamy Side Of Town

Glade Creek Mill

Glade Creek Mill

Cowboys And Indians

Cowboys And Indians

Amber Waves Of Grain

Amber Waves Of Grain

 

Interview with Tom Mc Nemar

EWW: I am curious to know what qualities of your work would others comment on first?

Tom:  I tend to get a lot of comments about the lighting I use.  As with all photography, the lighting either makes or breaks the image and I use light to focus the viewer’s attention to what I consider to be important aspects of an image.

 

EWW: What qualities of your work would you comment on first?

Tom:  The play between light and dark.  Most of my images tend to be a little darker overall and that allows me to enhance the contrast between light and dark.  I feel it adds a little more interest to the image.

 

EWW: What are your overall challenges in doing your work?

Tom:  I am primarily a still life photographer, so the first challenge is in coming up with an idea.  The second big challenge is choosing and finding the right props to complete the scene.

 

EWW:  When doing a shoot, what are the challenges?

Tom:  Speaking again as a still life photographer, it would have to be the selection and arrangement of the props and the lighting.  I maintain a large prop closet and am always on the lookout for new and interesting items.  As for the lighting, I use reflectors, flags, mirrors, etc. to try to get just the right amount of light in just the right places.

 

EWW:  You have several galleries in your portfolio.  Do you have a favorite?  Why?

Tom:  Although not as marketable, if I had to choose a favorite, I would say black and white.  There is an honesty to black and white.  When you strip away the color you remove distractions and the inherent beauty is revealed.

 

EWW:  You have a gallery devoted to Black and White.  For you, when is best in black & white versus color?

Tom:  That’s a hard question to answer.  I think black and white works well when there are fewer things to focus on in an image.  Black and white works well when you have contrasting elements with texture and detail.

 

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run in all your work such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

Tom:  I would have to say no.  I suppose I’m all over the place in that regard.  Not being a purest, the photo is often just the beginning; the canvas for further creativity.   I use a variety of software and techniques to achieve the final image.

 

EWW:  Do you think it is important for photographic artists to have their own website, in addition to another gallery they appear on?  If so, why?

Tom:  I do think that photographers should have their own personal website, but it takes time, effort, and diligence to drive the traffic to it.  If you are not dedicated to it and don’t have a little knowledge of Search Engine Optimization, the site can languish with few if any hits.

It can be very useful as a portfolio to showcase your work in a style and format of your own choosing and as a place to direct interested parties and inquiries.  I have done commissioned work and image licensing through visitors to my personal website.

 

EWW:  Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work?  If you do use social media platform, which one(s) work the best for you?

Tom:  I am not very good at marketing and do very little on social media.  When I do use social media, I get my best results from using Twitter.

 

EWW: Do you have any advice for individuals just starting to explore photography?

Tom:  The best advice I can give someone is to explore and experiment.  Learn your camera and what it can do then explore everything to see what you can do.  Experiment with all genres of photography and you will find your passion.

 

EWW:  Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?

Tom:  I consider myself to be a student of light.  I am fascinated by the subtleties of light and shadow.  I explore the many facets of photography and subject matter, but I always return to still life and fine art.  A still life image is created using refined lighting techniques and compositional skills rather than relying on the discovery of a ready-made, found image.  I have a keen appreciation for the work of the old masters and I find inspiration from the many fine photographers of today, but I really enjoy building an image from the ground up and making it totally my own.

Properly done, I believe an image can transport the viewer to another time, another place, or another emotion.

 

Website(s):

https://www.tommcnemar.com/

https://tom-mc-nemar.pixels.com/

 

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Horseshoe Bend Arizona Landscape

Horseshoe Bend Arizona Landscape

Mystery Manhattan

Mystery Manhattan

Antelope Canyon Arizona Landscape

Antelope Canyon Arizona Landscape

Quantum Divide

Quantum Divide

Mystery Manhattan

Mystery Manhattan

Horseshoe Bend Arizona Landscape

Horseshoe Bend Arizona Landscape

 

Interview with Az Jackson, Photographer, Sydney, Australia

 

EWW: I am curious to know what qualities of your work would others comment on first?

Az:   I go to great lengths to deliver images that people can get lost in and I would say what is most often commented on is the vivid colors and the detail in my images.

I also get a lot of “WOW’s” and congratulations and I even had one of my fans refer to me as the Ansel Adams of color, which I’m absolutely grateful for.

EWW:  The flip side of that would be your initial thoughts about your own work.

Az: I respect my work and I love that a lot of other people appreciate my art so that I can continue doing what I do.

In an average shoot, I will have a full gamut of images from what I think are some absolute rippers right through to snapshots and test shots. Shooting this way helps me improve and keeps me grounded at the same time.

 

EWW: When you do a shoot, what are some of the challenges you face?

Az: Believe it or not, after 15+ years of shooting, one of my biggest challenges is still my camera settings.

I shoot the inspiration I see in front of me using whatever camera I think is going to deliver the best results and only worry about the technical side of things as an afterthought. I find shooting this way provides me with less technical challenges and more creative freedom.

 

EWW: Your gallery contains color as well as black and white.  What considerations do you take when deciding whether an image should be color or black and white?

Az: None. My black and white images are most often created in the editing room. I love inspiring with color but unfortunately, the world can often be misinterpreted as a dark place and a lot of people find comfort in black and white, so I create them for that market.

 

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run in all your work such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

Az: Some people would say that I’m into color and you could probably recognize some of my most popular images from the vivid colors but I’m actually into delivering inspiration.

With my art, I want to help lift people’s spirits and distract them just long enough for them to appreciate the beauty of the world around them.

 

EWW:  Do you think it is important for photographic artists to have their own website, in addition to another gallery they appear on?  If so, why?

Az: 7 Billion people and counting. It’s extremely hard to get recognized in this world these days and you would be setting yourself up to fail if you only have one outlet.

Things were different a decade ago so throw out everything you were taught about the art world and seek feedback from your biggest supporters… your customers… from your own website, from social media and other community-based photography sites. Increase your creative footprint and you’ll increase awareness of your art.

 

EWW:  Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work?  If you do use social media platform, which one(s) work the best for you?  Why?

Az: These days social media is a necessary evil. Based on my research on social media is actually destroying the social construct of humanity. All the major platforms have cheated us, sold us out, broken our trust and are now seeking to silence our voice and further constrict our freedoms while making billions. Personally, I don’t think that’s fair and I don’t want to be a part of the problem.

So, therefore, I use social media very carefully and strategically. Facebook has taken away the chance to become popular by hard work, so I don’t post images to Facebook directly. I post links to my website and the images pop up on my feed. I use social media only as a means of awareness.

A business tip from one of my mentors… Find where your customers hang out and only focus on promoting to your top 2-3 social media platforms.

 

EWW:  Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work, that you think would be important for others to know about?

Az: Art is subjective and personal and what I have learned from this experience is that you have to have total faith in yourself as an artist.

If you are looking at becoming an artist or to delve deeper into your craft, listen to and follow your intuition first and foremost. In fact, allocate some “me time” and ask yourself some honest questions about your life. If you can match up what you want to do with who you want to become in a way that helps others, then you have a recipe for success. Ponder this… If you died today how would others perceive you? What would they say about you? What would be your legacy?

Be the inspiration you seek. Be the leader you follow. Be a part of the solution, not the problem.

 

Website(s): http://azjackson.com/

 

When Empires Fall

When Empires Fall

Tree Leaves On A Sea Change

Tree Leaves On A Sea Change

Tranquil Tasmania

Tranquil Tasmania

The Rise Of The Headless Horseman

The Rise Of The Headless Horseman

The Human Evolution

The Human Evolution

Entwined In Interconnectivity

Entwined In Interconnectivity

Conscious Creator In Awakening

Conscious Creator In Awakening

 

Interview with Ryan Jorgensen Photographer / Digital Manipulation, TAS, Australia

Artistic winter fashion portrait of a cold young man freezing in the blue frost of falling snow. In season clothes

EWW: I am curious to know what qualities of your work would others comment on first?

Ryan:   The quantity of works in my portfolio would be the most obvious thing people notice when first perusing my work. I’ve got a razor-sharp focus which is a positive and negative, usually equating to a 7-day waking work week, while the dishes pile and lawn unkemptly photosynthesizes. Thank goodness for the local wallaby lawnmowers, otherwise, my house would be lost to the grass.

EWW: What qualities of your work would you comment on first?

Ryan:   My work is a little quirky, I think my odd personality seeps into it aesthetically. I’ve never really had any artistic idols, so haven’t had any background influences guiding my style, I just tend to go in whatever direction feels right. My editing style (as with my choice in subjects) change from season to season, so this adds to the overall randomness quirk.

 

EWW: What are your overall challenges in doing your work?

Ryan: Finances are the biggest challenge in my work.  If I had crazy money, I could do some epically elaborate themes. I’ve spent most of my career working with faulty equipment and a shoestring budget, but this kind of adversity only build character in personality and character in artistic creations.

 

EWW:  When doing a shoot, what are the challenges?

Ryan: the constraints from market competitiveness on subject matter feasibility. I would have an endless choice in the subject matter with a highly converting folio, but getting a return on investment is a tricky gig in the competitive modern photography market. It’s been a blessing in that it has forced me to make magic with low budget subjects, one could class this an art form onto itself.

 

EWW: You have several galleries in your portfolio.  Do you have a favorite?  Why?

Ryan: I’m loving the style of pop art at the moment, so that would be my current favorite, however on a broader scale I’m a sucker for vintage fashion themes, so pinup would be my ultimate favorite. Not sure why this subject grabs me so much, maybe I was a flapper in the last life. I used to adore the horror genre, that was until I found out about the real horrors that go on in the higher echelons of power (see whistleblowers Ronald Bernard, Fiona Barnett etc.) I’ve since turned off horror. I have trouble even viewing this genre now.

 

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run in all your work such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

Ryan: Probably creative rebellion to technicality.  Nothing irks me more than rules, and when people purport to constrain the art form of photography, I do my utmost to break these preconceived deceptions. Real photography is art and in art, there are no rules.

 

 EWW:  Do you think it is important for photographic artists to have their own website, in addition to another gallery they appear on?  If so, why?

Ryan: I do think it’s highly advantageous to hold your own domain, especially if that domain has a cart for direct conversions. You’re doing yourself a disservice If you’re only selling on open marketplaces, as its competition city, with any search deviations equating to lost sales. If, however, you can direct traffic to your own little corner of the internet, conversions will be a lot easier (especially should the buyer decide to peruse other pieces on the site).

 

EWW:  Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work?  If you do use social media platform, which one(s) work the best for you?

Ryan: I did have a solid go with DARPAgram (AKA Instagram) but didn’t have much success. I think it may have been my inability to refrain from dropping truth bomb posts, which ultimately led to me being shadow banned. Personally, I’ve found the only reliable SM for art promotion to be Pinterest, it seems a logical choice with many users hunting for interior color pallets and decorating ideas. When you offer up a ready-made framed print that can be collected to a user’s décor moodboard, an instant sale is a much greater chance.

 

EWW: Do you have any advice for individuals just starting to explore photography?

Ryan: *DON’T DO IT…. lol *jokes. It’s by no means an easy task, but if your heart is in photography, and you’ve got the determination and stubbornness of an Alaskan Ox, then you can make anything happen. The most important thing you can do is write down a clearly defined list of determinable objectives, goals if you wish. Buy a cork board and pin visuals relating to conquering these objectives. Lastly, write down a battle plan for daily to-dos you must complete to meet the above-mentioned goals. If you can train your mind, the world is your oyster.

 

EWW:  Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?

Ryan: It’s a blessing to be able to do what I love, every day. To all the artists out there, enjoy the ride that your art brings. Create what you love and create it often. Embrace the terrible work of your past, it’s the rugged footholds in your expansive artistic journey.

Website(s): http://jorgo.photography/

 

Click on an image to enlarge it

Bottle Collector

Bottle Collector

Balloon Glow

Balloon Glow

Fire Truck Blues

Fire Truck Blues

Captains Flight

Captains Flight

Santa Fe Vintage

Santa Fe Vintage

Shelter In The Storm

Shelter In The Storm

 

EWW: I am curious to know, what qualities of your work would others comment on first?
Steven: The use of color and the details in the photographs, and often the unique subject matter.

 

EWW: When doing a shoot, what are the challenges you encounter?
Steven: Most of my photography is done outdoors. The weather and lighting is often a challenge. Visiting a location at optimal times are often very important in able to obtain a proper photograph.

 

EWW: Do you have a favorite theme or subject matter? If you do, Why?Steven: My favorite theme is what I call American Relics, items forgotten by modern society. This would include vintage buildings, vintage signs, and vintage trucks. These subjects are often abandoned and offer a wealth unnoticed beauty.

 

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there elements of your work that consistently run in all your work such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?
Steven: The use of bold colors and a gritty edge runs throughout most of my photographs.

 

EWW: In your opinion, for photographic artists what are the best ways for them to promote your work?
Steven: An online presence is very important to promote photography. Local art galleries and shows are a good place to provide exposure.

 

EWW: Do you use social media? If you do use social media, which one(s) work the best for you?
Steven: Facebook and Twitter seem to provide the best promotion for my photography.

 

EWW: Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?
Steven: Visiting locations for photography often needs a great deal of planning and work. Sharing photography with others is often the best reward.

Website(s):
http://steven-bateson.pixels.com
https://stevenbateson.smugmug.com

 

Back

 Scott Hansen, Photographer, Beaufort, SC, USA 

Click on an image to enlarge it.

 

Interview with Scott Hansen

EWW: I am curious to know what qualities of your work would others comment on first?

Scott: I get a lot of comments on my black and white images – especially the ones taken at the Old Sheldon Church.  Black and white photography has always been my favorite, so I tend to focus more on it than on producing color images.

 

EWW: What are your challenges in doing your work?

Scott:Finding the right scene with all the elements in place can be a challenge.  Also, having the right light is huge, but also things like having clouds in the sky.  A cloudless sky is just dead space in your image.

 

EWW:  When doing a shoot, besides the weather, what are the challenges?

Scott: A lot of what I mentioned above.  Lighting and location are huge.  Location being the landscape or subject that I’m photographing.  But as I think about it, there is something else that can become a major challenge – getting bored with your subject.  What I mean is shooting the same location over and over.  You don’t ever see a scene the same as you do the first time you lay your eyes on it.

 

EWW: You have several galleries such as the old Shelton Church, Shrimp Boats, Historic Place, Trains, and Trucks, etc.  Do you have a favorite?  Why?

Scott: The old Sheldon Church probably my favorite location to photograph.  There is really a lot of potential there.  However, it is a very well photographed location, so finding an angle that hasn’t already been taken is difficult.

 

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run from one work to the other such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

Scott: Most of my images will have a low country flare to them.  With all the live oaks and Spanish moss in my area, it would be difficult not to capture a little of the low country in each shot.

 

EWW:  Do you think it is important for photographic artists to have their own website, in addition to another gallery they appear on?

Scott: I do think it’s a good idea for photographers to have their own website, but probably more important these days to have a Facebook account.  You can use your Facebook account as a marketing platform to drive people to your website as well as your online galleries.

 

EWW:  Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work?  If you do use social media platform seems, which one(s) work the best for you?

Scott: I primarily use Facebook.  But in the future, something else may take its place.  The key is to be on the platform that everyone else is using.

Another one I like is Flickr.  In fact, I think that any photographer starting out should set up a Flickr account.  Be sure to tag your image up well.  Descriptive tags will enable people to find your work. Also, be sure to join several groups and actively post your images to those groups, and, be active in the group discussions.  This will draw more people to your page.

 

EWW:  Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?

Scott: I do.  keep striving to learn new things, and don’t let your head get too big.  When I first started posing images to Flickr, I felt I was a good photographer — But now, looking back… not so much so.

Capturing the image is only the first step.  Most good images are made great in the editing process.  There are some great programs out there that will plug into Adobe Lightroom as well Photoshop.  Many will even work well as a stand-alone program.

Google has purchased the Nik filters and made them free to download.  The Nik Silver Effects Pro is a must for any serious Black and White photographer.

 

Website(s):

http://thehansengallery.com

http://lowcountryphotography.net

 

EMOTIONS 2018 Group Exhibition

 

Emotion is often defined as strong feelings toward or those same feelings triggered by a specific object, situation or activity.  These feelings range from fear and despair to happiness and hopefulness.  Photographers and Digital artists were asked to visually show and emotion.  

Below are the top three placements for this competition selected by our juror panel.

Love Is Original - Best In Competition, Charlann Meluso

Love Is Original - Best In Competition, Charlann Meluso

Compassion

Auschwitz Memorium, 2nd Place, Matthew Jackson

Auschwitz Memorium, 2nd Place, Matthew Jackson

Deep & Utter sadness

Aftermath, 3rd Place, Matthew Jackson

Aftermath, 3rd Place, Matthew Jackson

Despair

 

To see more, of this exhibition got to Emotions, Group Exhibition 2018

 

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© 2018, Exhibitions Without Walls.  All rights to an individual image or set of images submitted for this competition and exhibition are retained by the photographer or digital artist. No copy can be made without the express permission from the photographer or digital artist.  Contact address is 1907 NE 17th Place, Cape Coral, FL  33909

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