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Interview with Just MagD

The world is my biggest inspiration. Nature is art. Cities and human creation can also be very inspiring. The graphic patterns of some buildings, houses, or streets make for an interesting design. colors, contrasts, life, its all before our eyes, it’s just a matter of interpretation, culture, and background. What amazes me most is how humans and nature mix, or don’t mix at all.  It also intrigues me how humans relate to each other.  Humans are constantly changing, affecting what is around them; adapting to nature, damaging it, when all that matters is respect.  For my personal work, which stems from these ideas, I’m mostly inspired by all the fairy tales my mom read to me when I was a kid, but always with that grown-up touch mixed with what is happening in the world.

 EWW: Besides the different Gallery Subjects, are there any themes that consistently occur in your work such as style, color, perspective, lighting movement, etc.?

JustMagD: Most of my portfolio consists of travels, landscapes & street photos. It is all in color.  The world is so colorful it’s difficult for me to shoot in black and white. I like to include irony in my street photos, usually doing so with a good composition. I think the composition is one important aspect of photography, and color can affect it a lot. Recently I have been in a cold climate, so my photos are white and blue and cold 😉

For my personal work, I love to use different photo collages and mixed media. There is usually a human presence, either clearly visible or just suggested.  Most of these projects question humanity, body and soul, feelings, and stage of life.

 


EWW:  What comments would others make about your work?  Is that consistent with what you would say about your work?

 JustMagD:  That’s a hard question.  I have had good comments about my photos taken in Alaska, especially because most of my audience is from France and not very used to that kind of life. Through my work, I hope to share the wilderness awe I discovered while I was there.

I have heard people say that my photo series “Rest in Pieces” was a bit “dark”.  This is what I would call “a touch of dystopia”.  Also, when they saw the art book I made of it, they said it was very poetic.  That’s a good mix for me, “dystopian poetry”.

EWW:  Your portfolio includes many galleries.  Is there one gallery in particularly you like to work with or have enjoyed working on?  Why?

JustMagD: I love shooting in Alaska, everything is so quiet there and so white.   There is a natural light reflection making everything look so soft. Going out is always an adventure.  You never really know what you’re going to see, if animals are going to be around, or if the Northern Lights will show up.  At the end, the magic surrounds you and makes you enjoy every second of the trip.  No matter how many good photos you took the moment was full of wonder.


EWW: Do you use social media platforms to generate exposure and the marketing of your work?  If yes, which social media platform(s) do you find to be the most successful for you?

JustMagD:    I’m on linkedin, instagram, flickr, and facebook. It takes a lot of time and energy to be present on these.  It’s not like you post something and become famous in an instant. You must be regular with your timing when it comes to posting things, and you must “like” and “share” other people’s publications.  It is also important to exchange ideas and communicate with other artists, photographers, magazines, blogs, etc…. My favorite is Facebook. I like it because it’s so general and inspirational.  You get everything, and you can share anything you want; photos, videos, texts, articles, a mood, or a comment.  You can also get in touch with artists and bloggers, for me, it’s the easiest one.

EWW:  Just to wrap up this interview.  Do you have any final thoughts about you and your work, which you think would be important for others to know about?

JustMagD:    I have heard many times, “As a photographer, I should specialize in one direction and stick to it.” But I am an artist.  I am curious about everything, and love learning new things. It is always hard for me to choose when there is so much going on everywhere around me… I do what I love, and I love what I’m doing.

My website as a long-term project reflects this.  It is always changing and improving the viewer experience, as I want to share my vision of the world.  And my vision of the world we all live in comes from my travel experiences crossing other people’s lives, and the natural wonders rendered in more classical photos. Influenced by such, my inside deeper feelings concerning the human soul and body, flow out, represented by a more artsy look, along with collage and mixed media.
All my projects, even though they are totally different in style, are connected. My photos come from how I feel, and how I feel comes from what I have lived and experienced.
A good photo should move you. It will touch you for its beauty, composition, colors, angriness, sadness, fun, etc. or it won’t. It just all depends on who you are.

To finish up, I just want to say thank you to my boyfriend, parents, and brother who is always patient with me, and the best support I could ask for, I love you guys!

 

Website: http://www.justmagd.com/

Other sites or blog: http://www.facebook.com/JustMagd

https://www.instagram.com/justmagd/

 

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Moon Rising Over A Calm Atlantic Ocean In Vero Beach, Florida.

Moon Rising Over A Calm Atlantic Ocean In Vero Beach, Florida.

Geese Flying Over Acton Lake On A Foggy Morning.

Geese Flying Over Acton Lake On A Foggy Morning.

Foliage On A Foggy Fall Morning On The Great Miami River

Foliage On A Foggy Fall Morning On The Great Miami River

A Water Ripple On The Ohio River On A Foggy Morning.

A Water Ripple On The Ohio River On A Foggy Morning.

Setting Sun Lights Up Clouds Over The Atlantic Ocean.

Setting Sun Lights Up Clouds Over The Atlantic Ocean.

The Dock At Miami Whitewater Forest On A Foggy December Morning.

The Dock At Miami Whitewater Forest On A Foggy December Morning.

 

EWW: What is the most memorable comment you’ve ever received about your artwork?

John:  Because I sell my photographs at juried art shows, I hear a lot of comments.  The one that I like most is when people say, “Oh, it feels so serene in here.”, as they enter my booth.  However, my all-time favorite comment came from a little girl talking to her father about a piece titled “Reeds” (which can be found on my website).  She told her dad, “It looks like one of those dead, dried-out spiders you find in the basement in the winter-time.”

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run from one work to the other such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

John:  As an artist, my primary goal is to create work that provokes an emotional response.  The mood I try to consistently invoke is one of calmness, serenity, tranquility … perhaps the Japanese word “wa” describes it best. I find the soft luminance and pastel color of early morning light goes a long way to engender that mood.

 Visually, nature can be quite chaotic.  Locating the simple compositions that I prefer is challenging, but I find them to be very rewarding.  The elegance, the poetic beauty of simplicity leads naturally to feelings of balance and harmony.

For me, color is nearly as important as composition.   I am particularly attracted to the pastel color palette.  I have numerous photographs that I think are technically good photographs, but if the color isn’t right then the photograph isn’t right.

EWW:  Do you think it is important for photographic artists to have their own website, in addition to appearing on other art gallery websites?

 John:  Today it is a virtual requirement for artists/photographers to have their own website.  Customers expect it and industry professionals expect it.

EWW:  Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work?  If you do use social media platform seems, which one(s) work the best for you?

John:  I am on Facebook.  I use it to show select photographs to gauge the reaction to images I am considering placing in my booth.  While I may love a given image, I don’t want to take up scarce wall space in my booth for images with limited appeal.

 

Websites: http://jfweller.com

http://www.Facebook.com/photowellfinearrt

“Clinging to the Past” by Mary Gerakaris was one of the most outstanding entries submitted to the Manhattan Arts International juried “New Beginnings” 2018 online exhibition and a clear choice for an Award of Excellence. The artist’s unique approach to her subject combined with her skillful photographic techniques had an immediate visceral impact on me.  As the curator, it was an honor to include her photograph in the exhibition.”
– Renee Phillips, The Artrepreneur Coach & Director, Manhattan Arts International

 

Click on an image to enlarge it.

In The Beginning

In The Beginning

Clinging to the Past

Clinging to the Past

Le Visiteur

Le Visiteur

Tempe Rouge

Tempe Rouge

Botanical Dance

Botanical Dance

Tropical Overlay

Tropical Overlay

 

Interview with Mary Gerakaris

EWW: You seem to have several subject matters. Is there one that you enjoy the most?

Mary: I enjoy all subject matter and what I photograph depends a lot on where I am and what I see.   My goal is to find beauty, and sometimes irony, in the form of people, nature, animals or buildings. However, I am particularly drawn to abstractions and they can be found in both natural and manmade objects.

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run from one work to the other such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

Mary: Because I was an art major before I studied photography, I feel that composition is key to taking quality photographs. So, to have a pleasing composition, color, perspective and lighting all come into play. I try to do as much composing as possible through the lens to minimize the adjustments made on the computer.

EWW: When you do a photoshoot. What do you focus on first? Technical or aesthetics?

Mary: Always aesthetics first. I feel that technical skills are ingrained…they have to be, or you can miss a moment.

EWW: I am curious to know if someone was asked to make a comment about your work, what do you think they would say?

Mary: Well, this is a tough one. From my perspective…creative thought-provoking, pleasing. My hope is that people who look at my work will be as excited as I am.

EWW: A few of your images are Black and White. How do you decide to work in black and white versus color?

Mary: Color can get in the way. If you look at images from great photographers of the past, who could only work in black and white, you will see some stunning images.  I must say I do like working in color, but the color in some images is too subtle, and they look better in black and white. At times I feel the composition is the strongest element in a photograph, so I eliminate the color altogether.

EWW: What do you see, or have experienced, as the most effective way for you to market and promote you and your work?

Mary: So far, exhibits and word of mouth have been the most successful. I am developing a better online presence, but there is a tremendous amount of competition out there. I think setting up a business takes time and patience.

EWW: Do you think it is important for photographic artists to have their own website, in addition to other online galleries they appear on?

Mary: Absolutely. My website is where I post most of my new work and I can update it constantly. Online galleries seem to be helpful only if they focus on a limited number of artists.

EWW: Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work? If you do use social media platform seems, which one(s) work the best for you?

Mary: Yes, I do. My website has been very helpful, and I have a business page on Facebook and Instagram.

EWW: Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?

Mary: I feel very strongly about the art that I produce…photography is a passion for me. My hope is to bring not only thought-provoking but beautiful images to people and to help elevate photography to the art form that it is.

 

Website(s): www.http://maryg-photo.com

 

Zebras

Zebras

Chimp and Butterfly

Chimp and Butterfly

Orangatan

Orangatan

Cow

Cow

Wolfe

Wolfe

Donkey

Donkey

 

Interview with Paul Neville

EWW: I am curious to know if someone was asked to make a comment about your work, what do you think they would say?

PAUL: That’s a hard question to answer, art is subjective and a very individual process. For me, art is anything that provokes thought or feeling so I guess I can’t say for sure how others view my work I can only hope that they feel something or some type of connection to the subject when they do.

EWW: How did you get started as a photographer?

PAUL:  I started quite late in life, I picked up my first camera at the age of 30 as a birthday present to myself. I began with a little entry level DSLR, a Canon 1100D, and found myself pointing it in every direction I could think of. I spent the next year or so taking what I would call “snaps” of anything I came across, flowers, landscapes, people, animals. You name it I do it. One day after finding myself at a loss I decided to visit my local zoo and that’s where my fascination with photographing animals began. I found I was noticing similarities between human and animal behaviors and decided that was the direction I wanted to take my art.

Now here I am 6 years down the line, multiple magazine and website features, book covers, international sales and shooting with my dream Hasselblad rig. I know it’s a cliché, but I truly feel blessed to be in the position I’m in.

EWW: One of your portfolio series is black & white instead of color.  What does this achieve that color would not?  How do you choose whether an image should be black and white or color?

Paul:  When we view an image in colour we tend to concentrate more on the colours themselves than the subject. With a monochrome or black and white image, there’s nothing to hide behind, the thing that draws the viewer to the subject is the impact it has. I feel a black and white image needs to be taken with that in mind, so you really need to concentrate on the composition and tones more so than with a colour image.

My aim is to convey feeling in all my work and sometimes the only way to get my message across is to shoot it

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run from one work to the other such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

PAUL: My main theme that I try to retain in all my work is emotion and a human connection. As I said previously, humans and animals share many similar traits but sometimes we seem to forget that. Animals laugh, they get excited, they grieve the same as we do and that’s what I try to capture.

EWW:  Do you think it is important for photographic artists to have their own website, in addition to another gallery they appear on?

PAUL:  Of course, websites are fantastic tools and nowadays as an artist, you are competing against hundreds of thousands just like yourself, a website is a great way of letting people know who you are and what you can offer.

EWW:  What have you experienced, as the most effective way for you to market and promote you and your work?

PAUL:  I’m a big fan of social media, you have an unlimited audience, everybody is on social media now from Facebook to Instagram to Twitter, you name it people use it. It’s a platform that opens the doors to millions of potential clients, you just can’t get that type of exposure anywhere else.

EWW:  Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work?  If you do use social media platform seems, which one(s) work the best for you?

PAUL:  Yes, I’m an avid social media user, as I said there are millions of people looking at social media pages every minute of the day so for me, it’s a no-brainer. I have found the best platforms for me have been Twitter, Facebook and Instagram

EWW:  Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?

PAUL:  My aim is to capture my subjects in such a way that it reminds the viewer how closely related we are to our animal counterparts. If a viewer can look at one of my pieces and feel something or say to themselves “Yeah, I get that “then I feel I’ve done my subjects justice and that’s the most important thing to me.

 

Website: http://paul-neville.pixels.com/

 

We excited to share with you five new publication of artwork done by our juror for ABSTRACTIONS 2018, Ellen Fisch.  She comments “Using form, shape, composition, line, and values, the abstract photography I create inspires the imagination to explore each image.”  In these five books of artwork Ellen also states, “All of the abstracts are unique and separate entities; however, when combined in a Folio, each one becomes threaded into a theme with its companions.”  Currently, these five publications of art done by Ellen, are available at Blurb.com   Another 5 are planned for this summer.

Click 0n a book cover for more information.  

Abstract Photography FOLiL I

Abstract Photography FOLiL I

Abstract Photography FOLiL BLUES II

Abstract Photography FOLiL BLUES II

Abstract Photography FOLiL III BLACKS

Abstract Photography FOLiL III BLACKS

Abstract Photography FOLiL IV GREENS

Abstract Photography FOLiL IV GREENS

Abstract Photography FOLiL V SANDS

Abstract Photography FOLiL V SANDS

 

 

Click on an image to enlarge it.

Barge Bumps

Barge Bumps

Curb Appeal

Curb Appeal

Liberty

Liberty

Siren Of The Sea

Siren Of The Sea

Storm Approaching

Storm Approaching

X Marks The Spot

X Marks The Spot

 

Interview With Charlann

Most of my abstract photography has been from inspiration within rather than from that of a particular photographer. However, I have always admired the urban photography of George Tice. His work has been an inspiration for some of my own urban street photography which has led me to discover abstract images in everyday settings.

EWW: Are there any themes that consistently occur in your work such as style, color, perspective, lighting movement, etc.?

Charlann: I have always been fascinated with the interplay of line, shape, color, and texture. My never-ending quest for unique and original abstract images always leads me to random patterns of texture, shapes, lines and color found on walls and other surfaces. Flowing lines, organic shapes, saturated colors and grungy textures are the common thread of most my abstract images. My love of artistic composition and design has an overwhelming effect on how I choose my subject matter and what becomes of it after capture. I may labor for hours or discard an image immediately if it is not to my satisfaction.

EWW: Your portfolio includes many subject categories. Is there one that is particularly you like to work with? Why?

Charlann:  “Abstract Photography” as showcased here in this interview is the category I particularly like to work with. I am extremely driven to discover images abstracted from everyday sources rather than the typical landscape, still life or portrait. Many of my abstract photographs are derived from portions of textured walls, rusted items, weathered surfaces and the like. Once they have captured my eye, I begin my photographic journey. Stimulated by what I have discovered, I feel an insatiable urge to turn the image or a portion of it into a work of art in its own right. The discovery process is very rewarding and fuels my desire for this type of photography.

EWW: Do you use social media platforms to generate exposure and the marketing of your work? If yes, which social media platform(s) do you find to be the most successful for you?

Charlann: Currently, as far as social media goes, I am only using Facebook and my website to generate exposure of my work and find that it is very limiting. I expect to expand to other areas of social media in the near future. My website is set up and featured as a gallery rather than a marketplace, but it does contain current listings of all of my exhibitions and gallery shows throughout New Jersey and New York as well as an inventory of awards that I have received for my images. In addition, I have recently become very active in online exhibits and competitions and have been very well received in these areas.

EWW: Just to wrap up this interview. Do you have any final thoughts about you and your work, which you think would be important for others to know about?

Charlann: The abstract images in my portfolio are diverse. The majority of them are created from natural occurrences, such as rust, decomposition, erosion, scaling and flaking paint on surfaces. Others are created by the hand of man. Nevertheless, each image bears its own identity and has its own beauty and appeal. It is those images which excite me the most…the accidental randomness of the elements of art amassed on a visible surface…the obvious “unidentifiable” subject matter which holds the viewer’s interest and piques his curiosity.

What I see and capture must satisfy both my eye and my soul and also have a visual impact that will evoke a feeling or reaction within the viewer with whom I strive to have a similar connection. Since my photographs are conceived with the notion to be seen, pondered and enjoyed, the emotional connection with the observer completes the intent of my artistry.

 

Website: http://www.charlannmelusophotoart.com/

 

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Upcountry Maui

Upcountry Maui

Photographer

Photographer

Honolulu Sunset

Honolulu Sunset

Night Lights Dresden

Night Lights Dresden

Red Sheet Venice

Red Sheet Venice

The Dance

The Dance

 

Interview with Ron Colbroth

EWW:  What would be your comments about your work, as a whole?

Ron: I find it hard to judge my own work without sounding too egotistical. Generally, I am trying to see the world from a different perspective. Of course, I don’t always succeed, but I have been told that I do see the world a little differently and appreciate those comments, especially when it comes from someone I respect. Although recently I was submitting to a competition in Athens, Greece, and was trying to decide on a couple of photographs to leave out, my wife said she loved those particular photos and I should include them in my submission. As it turned out, both the photographs were picked – one for the gallery and an additional one for the catalog, so there are days when I am not sure if I am the always the best person to judge my own work.

EWW: Ron, in your Fine Art Section of your portfolio you use black & white with a placement of color only on one object within the photograph.  Why is this?  What are you trying to achieve by doing this?

Ron: Strangely, it started with a blue surfboard. I had shot a photograph in Honolulu of a surfer coming on to the beach with a blue surfboard and thought about converting the photo to a B&W photo and having the blue of the surfboard as the only color. I like the result, so I started playing with other photographs I found interesting. I talked to those few trusted friends and their enthusiasm spurred me on. I published one book titled RED through blurb.comand has two more in various stages that will hopefully be finished soon. Also, jurors have been responding well to these photographs and several have been in multiple juried shows.

As far as what I am trying to achieve, again that is a difficult question, but I am just trying to bring out something in a photograph that would be lost, if I didn’t convert an image to B&W and then bring out an aspect that, I think, is unique to the photograph. One example is Bordeaux Blue.  I was just wandering around Bordeaux when I turned a corner and saw a shutter and a bicycle underneath, which were the same color blue. When I returned to my office and saw the photo on the computer screen, I thought is was nice, but could be improved, so now your eyes are drawn to the shutter and bicycle.

 

EWW:  What do you look for in deciding on what to shoot?

Ron: I suppose some aspect of color or design, but I don’t always succeed, of course. No one does. There are days when I think I am shooting the greatest photographs ever, but later looking at them on a computer screen and realize that they weren’t the greatest photographs ever. Then there are other photos that seem just okay at the time, but they really are truly wonderful. Once during the days of film, I was given ten rolls of film by a Japanese photographer friend who worked on a magazine put out by Konica. I was told I could shoot anything I wanted and they would publish the results. I was on my way to Portugal, but as I started shooting, I realized that if I shot and constantly bracketed that I would probably send the magazine ten photos for possible publication, so I started thinking about every photo I shot. Unless the lighting was tricky, I never bracketed. I was able to send sixty-five photographs and got the front cover, back cover and five pages inside. I still shoot like that with digital cameras. I think everyone should try an exercise where they don’t look at the camera display and pretend they are shooting film because I think they will become better photographers.

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run from one work to the other such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

Ron: These days I look for single colors in various scenes since I am doing these conversions to B&W. I love shooting with a wide angle lens, especially a 24mm. Ever since I first looked through a camera with a 24mm mounted on it, I have been in love with perspective. I love it for street photography, portraits, etc. I mainly use natural lighting and love working in the early morning and late afternoon. Of course, inclement weather and fog are wonderful, too.

EWW:  What do you see, or have experienced, as the most effective way for you to market and promote you and your work?

Ron: I belong to a couple of art organizations here in the DC area that has done a good job of maintaining websites where artist’s work can be viewed, which has led to my work being solicited for a solo show and also shown on Maryland Public Television. I also have been entering more and more national and international competitions, which have gone well. I am very selective about sites where I sell my work but have found a couple that is very professional and well run.

 

EWW:  What is your philosophy about Social Media.  Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work?  If you do, which social media platform seems to work the best for you?

Ron: I don’t use Social Media as much as I should, although it works well for some photographers. I find it hard to constantly bombard people about myself. I have a personal Facebook page but don’t have one for my photography business. I did use it to solicit votes for a completion last year, which worked out rather well. I have a Twitter account that I post on infrequently.

EWW:  Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?

Ron:  I hope I never have the hubris to think that I can’t keep exploring photography in new ways or learning from others. I recently read a book In Montmartre: Picasso, Matisse and the Birth of Modernist Art by Sue Roe. It was very interesting to learn how these artists struggled, but they also learned from each other and were constantly changing the face of art as they saw it. Some people love your work and others don’t, so just be true to your own vision, if you strongly believe in your vision.

 

WebsiteRon: www.roncolbroth.com

 

 

EWW: What would be your own comments about your work?

Marcus: I think of my photography as a growing series of images from “the field,” exploring the transient quality of light and our fragile physical environment. As an avid hiker, I’m especially drawn to less traveled locations like the national monument lands in Northern Arizona and Utah. The exposed geology in places like Vermilion Cliffs and Grand Staircase Escalante is truly amazing. Lately, I’ve also been shooting man-made urban landscapes, both here in the states and in Europe. It’s very much an ongoing process, mainly built on the study of lighting and composition.

EWW: What photographer or artist, past or present, has been an inspiration to you and your work? Why?

Marcus: That’s a tough question, as I’ve been deeply influenced by so many painters, photographers, and music composers. I’m especially inspired by painters of the Impressionism art movement – Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro – and their exploration of color and light. I’m also moved by the photographic works of Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and Art Wolfe.

EWW: You sometimes use black & white instead of color. Why is this and how do you choose whether an image should be black and white or color?

Marcus: Because my initial foray into photography was in black and white, I somehow tend to think of the outside visual world in monochrome. With today’s digital cameras, we can shoot the scenes in color and later convert the images to black and white. Still, when I’m on-site shooting landscapes, I often have a strong sense that a particular scene is best depicted in black and white. While there are exceptions, these scenes typically have strong cross-lighting, dramatic shadow areas, and a full grayscale – from pure white to pitch black. The more powerful monochromatic images also tend to feature bold structural elements which pull the viewer into the scene.

EWW: What do you look for in deciding on what to shoot?

Marcus: Pristine scenic areas without people are my favorite places for landscape photography. The locations need to be accessible during the times when the light reveals a magical quality, specifically during pre-dawn, evening “Golden Hour” and just past dusk. Many state and local parks have restrictive day-time public hours, which makes trip planning a real must.

Lately, I’ve been intrigued with photography leveraging natural light diffusers like fog, reflected light from illuminated canyon walls and pink dusk Aplen glow. I do quite a bit of research on hiking locations and “pre-visualization,” trying to identify locations likely to support these ephemeral lighting conditions.

EWW: Excluding subject matter, are there themes that consistently run from one work to the other such as colors, perspective, lighting, movement, style, etc.?

Marcus: Yes, and I am trying to expand beyond my familiar, most often presented nature themes. It is easy to become complacent and overly patterned in landscape photography. That said, most of my images are taken from broad, wide-angle vantage point – like that of a sweeping vista – with emphasis on the interplay of light, repeating patterns and textures in nature. My composition style tends to display a high level of detail in all parts of the image, from “corner to corner,” as opposed to subject matter with a strong central figure.

EWW: What is your philosophy about Social Media. Do you use social media platforms to market and promote your work? If you do, which social media platform seems to work the best for you?

Marcus: While the Internet is still, in many ways, a mystery to me, I’ve become a big fan of social media platforms to showcase new images and to communicate with other photographers. Most recently, I’ve posted I-phone photos and brief videos during our photography treks, and these have been well received. I make regular postings on my Facebook business page, Twitter and LinkedIn, with backlinks to my website. I have also tried using Tumbler, but have had no success with this platform.

For me, the downside is the large amount of time involved in social media exchanges, as I feel compelled to reply to questions and comments in a timely manner. While these exchanges can be fulfilling and helpful in promoting my portfolio, I find myself thinking that this precious time could be better spent outdoors shooting.

EWW: Just to wrap up this interview, do you have any final thoughts about you and your work that you think would be important for others to know about?

Marcus: First, thanks for the opportunity to discuss my photography and for providing the Exhibitions Without Walls outlet for digital artists. A note of deep appreciation goes to my family and friends, who have been so supportive of my photography over the years. Also, my thanks to the environmentalists, park rangers and others who preserve our precious lands. We’re so fortunate that earlier generations had the foresight to create a system of national parks and protected lands.

With everyone now carrying smartphone cameras, I’m pondering what the future holds for landscape photographers and fine artists in general. The long-term scenario, I think, holds an increasingly specialized and narrow niche for fine art landscape images. For those of us seeking to remain viable in this field, our challenge is to creatively define and redefine this space. Painters and other artists have faced similar challenges, with innovation leading the way to fresh genres.

This interview has prompted me to think about my future photography ventures, while also reinforcing my strong inclination to spend more time in the field. Throughout my journey as an artist, nature has always been a place for quiet exploration and discovery. It’s the place where natural light converges with composition, technical realities and the prospect of creating truly fresh images.

So, with that in mind, I’m redoubling my planning efforts for our upcoming photo trek to Bryce Canyon and Cedar Breaks national parks in Utah, and next for a return trip to Italy. So much to do, with endless photo ops just ahead …

Website: http://www.mwrphotos.com/

Blog URL: http://www.mwrphotos.com/blog

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mwrphotos/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/mwrphotos

 

 

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© 2018, Exhibitions Without Walls.  All rights to an individual image or set of images submitted for this competition and exhibition are retained by the photographer or digital artist. No copy can be made without the express permission from the photographer or digital artist.  Contact address is 1907 NE 17th Place, Cape Coral, FL  33909

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